Lessons in the "2010" Category

General Knowledge Quiz - October 2010

Score 10 points for every correct answer – Score 5 points if half right! Play a JOKER in one round and get DOUBLE points in that round. Show it before you start the round. There are 12 rounds with 6 questions in each round.

Topics include:

  1. Music
  2. African Geography
  3. The World Today
  4. Sport
  5. World History
  6. Europe
  7. British History
  8. Pot Luck
  9. UK
  10. Central Asian Geography
  11. The British Royal Family
  12. Film

Category: Quiz / General knowledge / ESL English

Studying English abroad

Many students want to learn English, as it is the business language of the world. One can blame the British Empire for that! Of course, there are 101 other languages out there to learn but where to learn English?

In England is the obvious answer! However, many students in non-English speaking countries enroll on local courses in their country. At each level - be they a beginner, pre-intermediate, intermediate, upper intermediate or advanced level they learn grammar, reading, writing, listening and speaking. Having a conversation in English is a vital part of the learning process.

Many students will probably be taught by a non-native speaker, as in some countries there is a shortage of native speakers. These teachers have themselves learnt English and are happy to pass their knowledge on to others. Some students however will get the opportunity to practice their English with a native English speaker.

Category: Languages / Studying a Language / English

Sarkozy suggests Roma ‘should be sent to Luxembourg’

French President Nicholas Sarkozy sparked a bitter European Union row by suggesting that the European Commissioner who compared his Roma policy to Nazi deportations should offer to host expelled gypsies in her native country of Luxembourg. The French President’s policy’ on expelling the Roma from their illegal encampments in France has created tension in the EU. It has ruffled feathers between heads of State, EU governments, the EU Commissioner and his deputy, who made the accusation against the French Presidents policy with that of the Nazi deportations.

Viviane Reding, a Luxembourger and the EU’s Justice Commissioner had on Tuesday (14th September) threatened legal action and described Mr Sarkozy’s treatment of Roma as a disgrace that reminded her of Second World War ‘round ups’ of gypsies and Jews. Brno Sido, a French senator said his country’s leader would personally raise the “scandalous criticism at the EU summit on Thursday”. He added that he was only applying European Regulations, French laws, and France was irreproachable in the matter but that if the Luxembourgers want to take them he had no problem.”

Category: Europe / European Union / Roma

The most commonly misspelled words in English…

The most commonly misspelled words in English were recently published. A survey of 3,500 Britons by the market research company www.OnePoll.com discovered that ‘Separate’ is the most commonly misspelt word in the English language. The eight-letter word came top due to regular placing of an ‘e’ where the first ‘a’ sits. Second in the list was ‘definitely’, which often falls victim to a string of mistakes including mixing up the second ‘i’ with an ‘a’.

Another common error is dropping the final ‘e’. ‘Manoeuvre’, which is problematic due to the unusual combination of ‘oe’ and ‘u’, came third and ‘embarrass’, in which an ‘r’ or an ‘s’ often falls by the wayside, was fourth. ‘Occurrence’ emerged as the fifth most commonly misspelled word due to confusion over the double ‘c’ and double ‘r’. Words just outside the top 20 include ‘calendar’, ‘pigeon’ and ‘changeable’.

Category: English Language / Survey / Spelling

A lost world discovered in Papua New Guinea

A lost world of giant woolly rats, fanged frogs, grunting fish and tiny bear like creatures has recently been discovered in Papua New Guinea. The exciting discovery was made by scientists and biologists in a remote volcanic jungle crater on the main island on the Pacific island.

The scientists who came from the United States, Britain and Papua New Guinea arrived at their destination by helicopter. Stepping off it they found themselves on a mist shrouded rim of the crater of Mount Bosavi. When they climbed into the kilometre deep crater where few humans have been they soon found more than 40 previously unidentified species.

They explored a pristine jungle habitat teeming with life that has evolved in total isolation since the volcano last erupted more than 200,000 years ago. The expedition that lasted 5 weeks discovered 16 species of new frogs that have never been seen before; at least 3 new fish, a new bat and a giant rat, which could turn out to be the biggest rat in the world...

The British Empire – where the sun never set

At its peak the British Empire was the largest empire the world had ever known. It was said ‘the sun never sets on the British Empire’ because its span across the globe ensured that the sun was always shining on at least one of its numerous colonies or subject nations. Its power and influence stretched all over the globe for several centuries.

For better or worse it had a massive impact on the history of the world. It was a product of the European age of discovery that began with the maritime explorations in the 16th century, which sparked the era of the European colonial empires. The America’s colonisation forming part of the first era of the British Empire.

Category: History / British Empire / Great Britain

A visit to Prague

Hands up those of you that have been to Prague. I can’t think of anyone who hasn’t - such is its popularity with visiting tourists. So why do people go there?

There are undoubtedly a 101 reasons why you should visit Prague - such is its charm. For those who haven’t, it might just be worth booking a trip there. For those not exactly sure where Prague is - let me inform you that it is in the Czech Republic, which is in ‘Central Europe – The Heart of Europe!’ It is the capital city.

Without further ado let me take you on a leisurely stroll around Prague… Known as ‘the Paris of the East’ and as ‘the city of 100 steeples’, its crowded old cobblestone streets serve tourists 365 days a year. It constantly tops other top European cities to visit - like London, Paris, Budapest and Vienna.

Dozens of airlines fly to Prague, often with cheap airfares, making it a bargain place to visit. From children to old age pensioners, the city is a huge hit with all ages. Prague offers tourists so much more than people expect.

Category: Holidays / Czech Republic / Prague

General Knowledge Quiz - September 2010

Score 10 points for every correct answer – Score 5 points if half right! Play a JOKER in one round and get DOUBLE points in that round. Show it before you start the round. There are 12 rounds with 6 questions in each round.

Topics include:

  1. Music
  2. North American Geography
  3. The World Today
  4. Sport
  5. World History
  6. Europe
  7. British History
  8. Pot Luck
  9. UK
  10. South Asian Geography
  11. Special Feature - Maths
  12. Film

Category: Quiz / General knowledge / English

My friend's sister is a pole dancer!

My friend's sister is a pole dancer. Really! I must admit I was a tad surprised when he told me. He even sent me a link of her on YouTube. (See below) It's not what you think! I met her once years ago. She's not the sort of girl you'd expect to do pole dancing.

Ange70x took it up as a hobby about 2 years ago. By day she works in an office. By night she's usually found at home practising her new found love of pole dancing, going to lessons once a week. Apparently it's great exercise not to mention a fantastic laugh.

At 39 she's no spring chicken. I played some of my adult female students her video clip. They were fascinated by her ability to do all the different dance positions admitting they couldn't do half of them. You see - it's not so easy. It got me thinking. Let's create an English lesson about it...

Category: Lifestyle / Dancing / Pole Dancing

Pakistan floods: Millions homeless: More aid needed

The recent floods in Pakistan have caused utter devastation across many parts of the country. Millions of people are now homeless, many are now without jobs. The agricultural heartland of the country has been destroyed. The monsoon-triggered floods have hit a fifth of Pakistan. An estimated 20 million people are affected.

Experts say food, clean water and shelter is urgently needed to avert a humanitarian catastrophe. Tens of thousands of villages remain under water. Aid agencies say the situation is actually worsening, as new flood waters continue to surge south down the Indus river. More flood defence systems are collapsing, forcing people to flee their homes. So far 1,500 have died in the floods. The threat of disease remains high.

The army has been dropping limited supplies in some areas but in many other areas there has been no assistance. There is a desperate need for international aid but so far this has been pitifully slow. The world does not seem to care about just how bad the situation on the ground actually is in Pakistan. But why? Is it the slow nature of the disaster relative to say an earthquake or tsunami? Maybe it’s because of the terrorist threat, the poor showing of the Pakistani politics or simply because it is just Pakistan?

Category: Asia / Pakistan / Floods