Lessons in the "English" Category

English regional accents to die out – urban accents to increase

A report analysing language trends from the past 50 years has been published by dialect coach, Brendan Gunn, and Dr Dominic Watt of York University, who is a sociolinguistic expert. The two looked at major modern cultural influences, to help predict what the future might sound like.

The analysis said that English regional accents are likely to die out in 50 years. Whereas, urban dialects are likely to rise, in big cities like Birmingham, Manchester, and Glasgow. The Queen's English could soon be a thing of the past, due to immigration. Multicultural London English, which incorporates pronunciations from West African, Caribbean, and Asian communities, will spread across regions.

New Words in Oxford Dictionary

Today, we are going to look at some of the 1,000 or so new words that have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary in their September quarterly update for 2016.

Ones to watch out for are ‘moobs’, ‘gender-fluid’ and ‘yolo’. ‘Scrumdiddlyumptious’ and other colourful Roald Dahl words like ‘Oompa Loompa’ and ‘human bean’ are included in the latest edition to celebrate the centenary of his birth. Another of Dahl’s words includes ‘splendiferous’, which means full or abounding in splendour.

‘Moobs’ are a term used for unusually prominent breasts on a man. ‘Gender-fluid’ describes a person who does not identify with a single fixed gender. ‘Yolo’ is the acronym for the term “You only live once”.

NFE CHRISTMAS QUIZ - DECEMBER 2015

Score 10 points for every correct answer – Score 5 points if half right! Play a JOKER in one round and get DOUBLE points in that round. Show it before you start the round. There are 12 rounds with 6 questions in each round.

Classic Christmas Music / Santa / International Xmas / Christmas General / More Classic Christmas Music / The Nativity Story / A Christmas Mix / Christmas Pot Luck / A UK Christmas / Christmas History / Famous Carols / Another Christmas Mix

Have lots of fun - good luck!

Merry Christmas!

English Words of the Year 2015

Today we will look at the English words of the year 2015, as noted by the Collins English Dictionary. These are the words and phrases in the UK that Lexicographers have noticed a significant rise in their usage over the last year.

We’ll start with the ‘word of the year’ that according to Collins is Binge-watching. This is where we stay in to watch more than three episodes of a series in a day. Apparently, 90% of Brits now do this!

NFE General Knowledge Quiz Number 2

Score 10 points for every correct answer – Score 5 points if half right! Play a JOKER in one round and get DOUBLE points in that round. Show it before you start the round. There are 12 rounds with 6 questions in each round.

Quiz rounds include:

Music / Geography South America / Pot Luck 1 / Sport / World History / Europe / British History / Pot Luck 2 / UK Today / Geography General / England / Film

Good luck with it and have lots of FUN!

Forget apps, try speaking to someone. It’s called conversation!

Today, we are going to talk about speaking. Do you remember how to speak? Sorry, am I interrupting a message you have just received on your mobile? Oh! You’d better look at it. It obviously takes priority over this speaking exercise!

Honestly – we need to reclaim the art of conversation. I mean, look around you. Half the people in the café, pub or bus are on their mobile phones sending messages to people they’ve probably never met. Why? Because it’s easier to use an app on their mobile rather than talk to that real person sitting opposite them.

New words added to latest Oxford Dictionary online

More than 1,000 new words have been added to the Oxford Dictionary online. In its latest update OxfordDictionaries.com reveals the current trends in the usage of the English language.

Currently British men are offending commuters by manspreading. Stop! Its beer o’clock! In the pub later Britons are talking about the Grexit and the Brexit while having a brain fart whilst enjoying a beer. It is all NBD.

The origins of the word ‘OK’

There are many thoughts as to the origin of the word OK. It is likely to have had African origins. The first written use of the word OK was in Tennessee, America, in 1790. An Andrew Jackson wrote: "Proved a bill of sale from Hugh McGary to Gasper Mansker, for a Negro man, which was O.K.”

However, in the American Choctaw Indian language, there is a word okeh, which means "it is so". It is likely this word was used in some American communities in the early 19th century.

In 1815, a William Richardson who had travelled from New Orleans wrote in his diary: ‘We travelled to NY we arrived OK.’ The Boston Morning Post is credited with introducing the word ‘OK’ (all correct) on 23rd March 1839 in the midst of a long paragraph. In 1840, one presidential candidate Martin van Buren was nicknamed ‘Old Kinderhook’ (OK), as he was a native from Kinderhook, NY.

During the 1830s & 1840s comical abbreviations flourished in the American press, thus helping spread the word. In the 1860s, British people were taught not to use this ‘American word’, as one wouldn’t be speaking ‘correct’ English.

Category: USA / Origin of Words / OK

Diplomatic English - Flip Flop Diplomacy

How many diplomats wear flip flops at work? Not many I hear you say! Certainly few would meet the American president at the White House in Washington wearing them. Least of all in the middle of a harsh freezing winter in February! So who in the diplomatic world might wear them then? The answer was the Dalai Lama. Naturally, he was no ordinary visitor. His mere presence or impending presence was enough to send the Chinese government into a diplomatic overdrive of threats and retaliation. The question was would the Obama government listen to any of it? The visit would certainly test the administration’s commitment to human rights and for its willingness to stand up to China. Before his arrival nothing was left to chance by the White House that minutely choreographed the diplomatic visit. It was as important how the Dalai Lama was to be received as what was to be discussed behind closed doors with him.